Tag: Chado

Meibutsu-gire – the famous named fabrics

We have most often seen the meibutsu-gire, or famous named fabrics as kobukusa, the small patterned cloth, mounting for scrolls, and as shifuku or bags made to contain utensils.  During the haiken or appreciation dialog, the guests ask about the shifuku fabric.

While there is a close relationship between Tea and meibutsu-gire, not all fabrics …

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Reviving the art of Nishiki

Nishiki is Japanese brocade fabric.  According to my sources and notes:  The patterns for this brocade are woven from various colored weft floats traveling over a limited distance.  In the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD), in China, they produced a warp-faced nishiki where colored warps skipping over a number of adjacent wefts formed …

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Beginning Chanoyu

I have a new class that I will be offering this spring

Beginning Chanoyu

In this 10 week class, students will learn  the first procedure, Ryakubon.  It is a complete tea ceremony with all the essential elements, but you can do it without a lot of equipment or tea room.  I have shared tea this …

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Introduction to Chado class now forming

I have had some inquiries about when my next introduction class will be held.  And now here it is: starting Saturday, April 28th 1:00-2:30 for 10 weeks.

Introduction to Japanese Culture through the Tea Ceremony

Harmony, purity, respect and tranquility.  These are the four principles of tea ceremony distilled from Japanese culture.  In this ten …

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Upon entering the tearoom

Upon entering the tearoom, it is important above all else that both host and guests compose their frame of mind so as to be completely free of extraneous thought; this attitude should be harbored within and not displayed outwardly. ~ Murata Shuko (d. 1502)

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