Things Chado has taught me, part 2

Thank you for the great response to the previous post on what Chado has taught me.  I would like to extend my gratitude to those who read these posts and never comment, but I find out later they have been following for a very long time.

If you would like to share things Chado has taught you in the comments, I would love that.  Thank you, and I hope these posts contribute to your own journey with tea.

Here are the next 10 thing Chado has taught me:

  1. Be humble. Respect others. Give appreciation without flattery. 
  2. Everything has a spirit and a story. Don’t just consider something by itself, consider all the hands that touched it, shaped it, and used it before you. 
  3. Cleaning and preparation takes more time than the temae. 
  4. There is a lot of hidden work that goes into a tea gathering. Consideration of such unseen elements applies to many things outside tea. 
  5. Hataraki. Making it work when things aren’t as you expected or exactly as they’re “supposed to be”. 
  6. Leave the world outside when entering the tea room, but bring the tea room with you out into the world. 
  7. Tea is not a solo event. The best tea is shared. 
  8. Patience. Everything has its own time, and the journey is where the value lies. 
  9. Going back to basics. It’s important to continually practice the most basic forms. It’s easy to pick up bad habits when you are focusing on more complex procedures. 
  10. Tea is best enjoyed with a working knowledge of all the elements involved – ceramics, woodworking, tea making, ironwork, bamboo work, calligraphy, etc. 

Permanent link to this article: https://issoantea.com/things-chado-has-taught-me-part-2/

2 comments

    • admin on December 18, 2022 at 4:08 pm
      Author

    Bob, Thank you for your comment. Absolutely all of those things and so much more!

    • Bob on December 18, 2022 at 3:57 pm

    [10. Tea is best enjoyed with a working knowledge of all the elements involved – ceramics, woodworking, tea making, ironwork, bamboo work, calligraphy, etc. ]

    and Japanese classical poetry, history, textiles, architecture, language, gardening, etiquette, cooking and so much more…..

    and that, of course, is why we love it!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

%d bloggers like this: