Author's posts

Telling Stories

One of the pleasures of attending a tea gathering are the stories told at the gathering.   Putting together how the meaning of the scroll and the choices of the utensils along with the poetic names of the sweets and chashaku make for an interesting time.

Some of my students are beginnning to study the kazari …

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The Hunger for Knowledge

One of the things that is a little frustrating to me is that I do not speak Japanese, nor do I read. I have a number of books in my collection about Chanoyu that are written in Japanese and I hunger to read and get the information from them. All that knowledge and I can’t …

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Tea Utensils Now Available at SweetPersimmon.com

I have just updated my store SweetPersimmon.com with Chanoyu utensils and new handbags.  Many old handbags are now on sale.  Natsume, chashakku, chasen, hishaku are now available at the store.

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Newly designed Issoan Tea Site now Live

Great news!  The Issoan Tea Site is back up again.  It is newly re-designed to make navigation much easier. (And updating much easier for me).  Eventually, this blog will be incorporated into the site.  I still have to figure out how to tranfer the archives here to get them to show up over …

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Michael Kenna in Hokkaido

I took the photo above rather in tribute to Michael Kenna. He is one of my favorite photographers.  He first came to my attention about 15 years ago, and I have been following his career ever since.  He works exclusively in Black and White film.  His photos are a meditation just to look at …

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